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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 53  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 166-171

Prevalence and pattern of bacteria and intestinal parasites among food handlers in the Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria


1 Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University/ Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, PMB 5025 Nnewi Anambra State, Nigeria
2 I O Chuks Atlas Health Care Services LTD, Garki 11, Abuja, Nigeria
3 Institute of Human Virology/ Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
C O Ifeadike
Department of Community Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University/ Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, PMB 5025 Nnewi Anambra State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0300-1652.104389

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Background: In developing countries, biological contaminants largely bacteria and other parasites constitute the major causes of food-borne diseases often transmitted through food, water, nails, and fingers contaminated with faeces. Accordingly, food-handlers with poor personal hygiene could be potential sources of infections by these micro-organisms. Objective: This study was aimed at determining the prevalence and pattern of bacteria and intestinal parasites among food handlers in the Federal Capital Territory. Materials and Methods: The study was a descriptive one in which a multistage sampling technique was employed to select 168 food handlers of various types. Subjects' stool, urine, and fingernail analyses were carried out and the result scientifically scrutinized. Results: Fingernail bacteria isolates include: E. Coli (1.8%), coagulase-negative staphylococcus (17.9%), Staphylococcus aureus(7.1%), Klebsiella species (2.4%), Serratia species (1.2%), Citrobacter species (1.2%), and Enterococcus species (1.8%). The subjects' stool samples tested positive: For A. lumbricoides (14.9%), T. trichuria (1.8%), S. starcolaris (3.0%), E. histolytica (10.7%), G. lambilia (1.8%), S. mansoni (1.2%), and Taenia species (4.8%). Furthermore, 42.3% and 15.5% of the stool specimen tested positive for Salmonella and Shigella species, respectively. Conclusion: Food establishments should screen and treat staff with active illness, and regularly train them on good personal and workplace hygiene practices.


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