Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
Users Online: 1250

 

Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Advertise Contacts Login 
     
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 60  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 80-86

In what ways might stories and anecdotes impact upon the quality of small group teaching in obstetrics and gynecology?


Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Delta State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara, Delta State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Onome Ogueh
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Delta State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara, Delta State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nmj.NMJ_32_19

Rights and Permissions

Objectives: The aim of this study was to find out how stories and anecdotes might improve the quality of the daily morning obstetrics and gynecology (O and G) teaching and determine if the emotions generated by the stories and anecdote deepened the understanding of medical topics. Materials and Methods: The overarching approach to this study was action research. On two occasions, I told stories using PowerPoint presentation during the morning teaching in the O and G seminar room to 10 and 11 learners instead of the traditional factual presentation of a medical topic. The learners ranged from the 3rd-year medical students to 4th-year specialist trainees in O and G and a consultant anesthetist. Each learner completed a feedback questionnaire at the end of the teaching session. I noted the learners' comments and analyzed written feedback. Results: More than 90% of the learners agreed or strongly agreed that the stories were appropriate for their level of training, and on both occasions, every single learner agreed or strongly agreed that the stories improved the quality of the morning teaching. On both days all but one learner agreed or strongly agreed that the stories improved their understanding of the medical topics, and a senior O and G trainee wrote that the story was: “useful – improved my understanding of situation involved.” The stories generated a lot of emotion in the learners, emotions that deepened their understanding of the topic covered. Conclusion: Stories and anecdotes appear to improve the quality of teaching, and this was the case regardless of level of training and experience of the learner. Hence, stories and anecdotes may be an excellent teaching tool in a setting like the morning teaching where the learners are quite varied.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed51    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded0    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal